A social impact entrepreneur with a background in brand building Genevieve leads the brand and community side of Daye, the category-defining, cramp fighting, CBD infused tampon company. We caught up with Genevieve ahead of the General Assembly talk this Thursday to get understand what femininity means to Daye and what she thinks the future of femininity will hold.

Q: Could you tell us about Daye. How did it start? Why did it start?

Daye started out of curiosity and a desire to do things better. Without having a medical or a scientific degree, but supported by a number of OBGYN advisors, our founder Valentina started mapping out what better period care could look like.
Since then, we’ve gotten closer to launching the world’s first pain-relieving tampon to market. The values Valentina started with remain core to the Daye team – we care to do things right, never cutting corners and continuously persevering through different challenges. Whether it’s setting new standards in clinical testing for tampons or their manufacturing, or raising the bar in packaging sustainability, the Daye team is dedicated to building the tools women need to be their own health hero.

Q: What is femininity and what does it mean to Daye?

To me, femininity is strength. It’s emotional intelligence, compassion, loyalty, creativity, intelligence and stoicism. Most of all it’s indefinable. It’s whatever you make of it.

At Daye, we’re striving to build the tools women need to own their unique health journey. We believe having a deep understanding of your body, mind, and soul is essential to that journey. We celebrate modern womanhood because it defies definition. There is no one-size-fits-all definition of femininity, just as there is no one-size-fits-all model of what it means to be “healthy.”

Every woman-identifying human is different, has different strengths and weaknesses, different needs. We seek to elevate the voices of our community to paint a modern portrait of womanhood—to create a mosaic of voices and lifestyles that represent a new normal.

That said, we believe there is a collective experience shared by modern women—a desire to promote the collective well-being of women everywhere, not just individually.

Q: How is our understanding of femininity changing and how do you think it is currently playing out in The West?

Femininity has traditionally been used to describe the “weaker, sweeter gender,” those whose womanhood is defined by and tethered to marriage and children. Today women have the right to not define it. To not apologize for it. Or celebrate it. To just be themselves.

Q: What are the shifts driving this change?

From an investment perspective, studies show women-led or women-inclusive companies are, on average, 30% more profitable, experience greater innovation intensity (aka produce 20% more patents than teams with male leaders), and are often more admired than companies with a majority level of men in senior management. These are pretty hard stats to ignore. This past year only 2% of venture capital investment was given to female founders. It’s important for human beings across the gender spectrum to know and understand how far we are from equal or even significant representation in the working world.

Q: Finally, what will the future of femininity look like?

Hopefully, a world in which both men and women embrace their innate femininity. A world in which increased compassion, creative problem-solving, and emotional intelligence allow for less violence and conflict and more collaboration and innovation. In the future, femininity will be lauded on par with masculinity. We envision a world in which women can define womanhood for themselves, without judgement or agenda from other women or men.

Plus get your tickets for tomorrows talk HERE

Author

Clemmie has a background in anthropology and a wealth of experience in behavioural science having worked in strategy, insight and behaviour change.

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